Isaiah 6 – The Gift of the Great Volunteer


As millions the world over are hailing the eve of the commemoration of the birth of Christ, and anxiously waiting to get at the presents they have been seeing under the green tree for weeks, what is on your mind? It has been shown that while the affairs of men continue, God is still upon the throne, whose holy character never changes:

“In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple. Above it stood the seraphims…And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory.”

In the holiday season, many may indulge themselves, making merriment, and feeling secure in self-righteousness, but what is the experience of even the prophet Isaiah?

“Then said I, Woe is me! for I am undone; because I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: for mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.”

In view of the character, the glory, of the Lord, Isaiah felt no security in his own condition. Then, when an angel purged the prophet by touching his lips with a coal from the altar, we see the likeness of Christ:

“Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me.”

Gift of the Great VolunteerWe can see in this, a glimpse of the immeasurable love of God as all Heaven was poured out in the one gift of Jesus Christ, who volunteered to leave the throne of the universe to come in the form of fallen humanity, living the life of a humble peasant and taking upon Himself the superhuman agony of having the sins of you and I laid upon Him–being obedient to the death of the cross. He could have allowed man to perish alone, but Christ said, Here am I; send me. Let us not forget this during this holiday season, and volunteer our lives for Christ that others may live eternally.

 

May you have a holy holiday season,

Jeffrey Maxwell

 

Scripture portions quoted from the King James Version. Public Domain.

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